Register
 
RSS Feed Twitter MySpace Facebook Digg Flickr Delicious YouTube

The Grand Budapest Hotel reaches top spot in the UK

Share This:
  • Share this on Google+2
  • Share this on Linkedin2
  • Share this on Reddit0
  • Pin this page0
  • 4

Quirky comedy The Grand Budapest Hotel reaches the top spot in the UK after four weeks on release bringing in £2,011,249 last weekend. The film revolves around the adventures of Gustave H, a legendary concierge at a famous European hotel between the wars, and Zero Moustafa, the lobby boy who becomes his most trusted friend. The Grand Budapest Hotel, which is directed by Wes Anderson has grossed a worldwide total of $69,967,772 (£42,033,307.08) and unusually risen up the charts in its fourth week to become Anderson’s first number one film in the UK.  The surprising increase in popularity of the film could be the combination of the fact there aren’t many high profile films being shown at the moment and the impressive reviews the film has received such as Peter Bradshaw of The Guardian stating, ‘I can’t think of any filmmaker who brings such overwhelming control to his films. Alexandre Desplat’s score keeps the picture moving at an exhilarating canter, and the script, co-written by Anderson and his longtime collaborator Hugo Guinness is an intelligent treat. Watching this is like taking the waters in Zubrowka. A deeply pleasurable immersion.’

Falling to second place is American action film Need for Speed which made £1,309,103 last weekend bringing its total to £3,691,108 after two weeks on release. The film stars Aaron Paul as street racer Tobey Marshall, who sets off to race cross-country, as a way of avenging his friend’s death at the hands of a rival racer.

Moving up from fourth place to third is computer animated comedy, The Lego Movie which has made £31,128,785 gross in the UK after six weeks in the box office charts, with £1,223,370 of that coming from last weekend.

Third weekend on release sees 300: Rise of an Empire reach fourth place after making £998,176 in cinema ticket sales last weekend. The film, which has made a total of £6,868,104 in the UK, follows the story of Greek general Themistokles as he leads the charge against invading Persian forces led by mortal-turned-god Xerxes and Artemisia, vengeful commander of the Persian navy.

Non-Stop isn’t moved from fifth place, making £901,107 last weekend bringing its gross in the UK to £8,097,443 after four weeks on release in the UK.

New in sixth place is British prison drama, Starred Up directed by David Mackenzie and scripted by Jonathan Asser, who based the film on his own experiences working as a voluntary therapist at HM Prison Wandsworth, with some of the country’s most violent criminals. The film, that made more than £420,000 on its opening weekend, stars Jack O’Connell, Ben Mendelsohn, and Rupert Friend. The title is a term used to describe the early transfer of a criminal from a Young Offender Institution to an adult prison. Starred Up follows a troubled and explosively violent teenager who is transferred to adult prison where he finally meets his match. The film has received acclaim by critics and at festivals such as the London Film Festival, where Asser was named the Best British Newcomer, for its acting (particularly for Jack O’Connell and Ben Mendelsohn), David Mackenzie’s direction and the father-son dynamic of Asser’s screenplay. Peter Debruge of Variety reviewed the film and states, ‘Mackenzie isn’t attempting to craft a larger-than-life anti hero here, but delving into the sociology of this hellish subculture, where prisoners and staff alike coexist in this dehumanizing environment.’

British dark comedy A Long Way Down is in seventh place after bringing in  over £280,000 in its opening weekend. The film is loosely based on author Nick Hornby’s 2005 novel, A Long Way Down and stars Imogen Poots, Toni Collette, Pierce Brosnan, and Aaron Paul as four strangers who happen to meet on the roof of a London building on New Year’s Eve, each with the intent of committing suicide. The film received generally negative reviews with Kent Online stating, ‘Despite strong performances from each of the main cast, A Long Way Down doesn’t hang together well. The script and plot are largely true to Hornby’s book but the film feels higgledy-piggledy and there’s a noticeable rush to tie up loose ends in the final 15 minutes.’

Eighth place sees American drama Labor Day; loosely based on the 2009 novel of the same name, bring in £257,812 on its opening weekend. The film follows depressed single mom Adele and her son Henry as they offer a wounded, fearsome man a ride. As police search town for the escaped convict, the mother and son gradually learn his true story as their options become increasingly limited. The film which stars Kate Winslet and Josh Brolin in lead roles has made a gross of £278,726 in the UK. Labor Day has received mixed to negative reviews with the consensus on Rotten Tomatoes stating, ‘Kate Winslet and Josh Brolin make for an undeniably compelling pair, but they can’t quite rescue Labor Day from the pallid melodrama of its exceedingly ill-advised plot.’

Falling from sixth place to ninth place is comedy Ride Along on its fourth week making £242,010 and totalling £3,945,786.

An impressive seven weeks on release sees animated comedy Mr Peabody and Sherman reach tenth place with £238,694 and a gross of £12,600,160.

Look out for next week: Captain America: The Winter Soldier, The Legend of Hercules and Muppets Most Wanted.

Share This:
  • Share this on Google+2
  • Share this on Linkedin2
  • Share this on Reddit0
  • Pin this page0
  • 4

Comments

comments

Tagged with:
Skip to toolbar