Log in Register
 
RSS Feed Twitter MySpace Facebook Digg Flickr Delicious YouTube
Prime
UKScreen Rating:

Prime – Review

WHAT’S IT ABOUT?

Rafi (Thurman) has just got divorced. Her therapist Lisa (Streep) is doing her best to keep her spirits up.
It’s not long before Rafi meets a new man – a younger man – a much younger man, David (Greenberg).
She’s worried about the age difference, but Lisa tells her she should enjoy herself.
Perhaps the biggest obstacle to their happiness isn’t the age difference, but the fact that his David’s nice Jewish parents would prefer he had a nice Jewish girlfriend.
This film follows all the trials and tribulations of new love, as the couple in question struggled to overcome their own issues – and the new issues that arise out of their relationship.
He wants his parents to accept a non-Jewish girlfriend, almost old enough to be his mother. She wants him to grow up, so that he can offer her everything she needs to make her happy, rather than just most of the things she needs.
It has all the usual staples – happiness, sadness, love and hate, things going wrong – they break up, things going right – they make up, and so on.
They’re both going through difficult times in their lives and find solace in each other as they try to move forward.

WHAT’S IT LIKE?

As a young Jewish man who’s had a relationship with an older gentile woman (I hope my parents aren’t reading this!), I can certainly identify with David in many ways – so for me, there was a lot of familiarity in the circumstances he encounters, but I would hazard a guess that David and I are somewhat in the minority, here.
That being the case, for most viewers, the film will have to work rather harder – and rather better – to grab them in the same way.
Age and cultural differences are hardly ground-breaking plot devices, although they are handled warmly enough here, with a twist or two to maintain interest in the plot. And Meryl Streep’s light touch feels delightfully real.
One problem is that David isn’t quite likeable enough – he’s a little too arrogant for us to root for him as much as the film-makers seem to think we should. We (I?) can share his excitement at this fantastic catch – come on, it’s not just an older woman, but it’s Uma Thurman! – but you’ve got to show a woman like that the kind of respect she deserves. I guess his inevitable immaturity is part of the point of the plot, but after an endearing first few minutes, it begins to grate very rapidly.
We do like and feel for Rafi, however, which makes it even harder for us to want the relationship to work out, because we just know that David can’t make her happy in the long run, unless he changes. Any other film would be about how he changes, to make the relationship work, but not this one.
It also doesn’t help that once the relationship gets into full swing, there’s not enough chemistry between them – we certainly don’t feel that this is a couple in love. Their relationship becomes little more than a hook from which to hang some – admittedly successful – gags, even if reality is stretched somewhat, to get them to work.
It’s alternately charming and contrived, insightful and messy.

opens nationwide 12th May 2006

Comments

comments

Tagged with:

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Skip to toolbar