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Straightheads
UKScreen Rating:

Straightheads – Review

WHAT’S IT ABOUT?

City executive Alice (Anderson) takes a liking to the young lad fitting a security alarm at her posh London pad, Adam (Dyer), so she invites him to her boss’s party at his mansion in the country.
On the way home, they’re accosted by a gang of local yokel thugs, who beat Adam to within an inch of his life and rape Alice over the bonnet of her car.
Adam ends up moving in with Alice and they help each other recover and move on with their lives.
But on Alice’s first day back at work, she gets a call to say her father has just died.
She moves into her Dad’s country home to sort out his affairs, and while driving around the area, she recognises a neighbour as one of the men who raped her.
Here begins a determined plan to seek vengeance.
As Alice and Adam inch closer to the gang, they realise that all is not as it seems on that fateful night, but their determination is undimmed. They need justice – and they need to administer the justice themselves.

WHAT’S IT LIKE?

This is an exceptionally dark and violent psychological drama, which depends entirely on the viewer developing a sympathy with the two main characters.
But the relationship between Adam and Alice is simply unconvincing and the fact that both of them are cold, emotionless and generally quite selfish doesn’t help us warm to them.
I’m not saying that they’re so unpleasant that they deserved to be attacked – but it makes it difficult for us to accept their chosen course of action.
The plot itself was corny and contrived and riddled with clichés. At first, she’s the angry and vengeful one while he’s more reticent, but when she eventually lightens up, he begins to burst with uncontrollable anger.
It was all just too convenient – she happens to have a big party just around the corner from the house where she grew up – and oh, what a surprise, when her Dad dies only weeks later, she ends up moving back to the house – just around the corner from where she was raped.
Then there’s the fact that we’re apparently meant to feel sorry for one of the bad guys at the end, like it’s OK to rape someone if you think it’ll protect someone else.
The film has a highly twisted, immoral core, laced in a bad-tasting misanthropy.
There’s almost nothing to recommend this unpleasant low budget thriller, except perhaps its short running time.
It’s highly uncomfortable to watch – but not in a satisfying way – and it feels like a tremendous waste of what little UK Film Council lottery money there is to go around.

opens nationwide 27th April 2007

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